Polarization

As is the case with other chemical reactions, the driving force of a corrosion reaction is related to the difference in energy between an initial equilibrium that is higher in energy than the final equilibrium. As corrosion action proceeds, this difference in energy tends to decrease as a result of the effects of the products of anodic and cathodic reactions in the vicinity of the corrosion sites. The cathodic reaction, and with it the overall corrosion reaction, would slow down if, for example, the hydrogen product of the cathodic reaction were not removed by evolution as gas or some reaction involving oxygen. This slowing down is said to be the result of cathodic polarization.

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