High-Temperature Corrosion

High-temperature corrosion is a form of corrosion that does not require the presence of a liquid electrolyte. In this corrosion mechanism, metals react directly with gaseous atoms in the atmosphere rather than ions in solution. Sometimes, this type of damage is called “dry corrosion” or “scaling.” The first quantitative analysis to oxidation behavior was made in the early 1920s with the postulation of the parabolic-rate theory of oxidation by Tammann and, independently, by Pilling and Bedworth.

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